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"The Book of Life" Oct. 17th 

Read more about the Mexican folk art tale. 

http://herocomplex.latimes.com/movies/book-of-life-spins-colorful-folk-art-fantasy-tale/#/0

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LPB Premiers Online Programming on PBS.org for Hispanic Heritage Month

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Let Me Tell You About The Octopus Project. 

Full episode can be found on http://www.klru.org/artsincontext/episodes/

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hifructosemag:

John Grade is a Seattle-based artist who creates monumental installations that significantly alter the viewers’ experience of architecture and nature. Gritty, industrial materials are Grade’s trademark. He likes his work to have weight in an almost precarious sort of way, as if the piece might give and crush the viewer at any second. Inspired by the land art movement of the ’60s and ’70s, Grade’s work echoes the scale and impact of famous Earthworks like Spiral Jetty, though most of his interventions take place inside of museum and gallery environments rather than the land itself. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

Source: hifructosemag
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hifructosemag:

Design collective Numen/For Use was incepted in 1998 as a way for its members — industrial designers Sven Jonke, Christoph Katzler and Nikola Radeljković — to push the boundaries of architecture, design and conceptual art. They’ve collaborated on everything from furniture design to elaborate installations that invite the viewers to break the norms of how they ordinarily interact with space. Rarely do we see adults take off their shoes to bounce and play, but Numen invites their audiences to do just that. Their latest piece,String in Vienna is an inflatable, bounce house-like structure with an elaborate grid of cords that allow viewers (more aptly, participants) to defy gravity. Their other recent works include a levitating cave made out of clear tape in Tokyo and another inflatable structure with hammock-like netting hung strategically for optimal bouncing in Yokohama, Japan.

See more on Hi-Fructose.

Source: hifructosemag
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cross-connect:

Featured Curator: Justin Ruckman

Vilde J. Rolfsen uses light and colored backgrounds to make these otherworldly plastic bag landscapes. She finds the bags on the street, an easy task considering Americans blow through over 100 billion a year.

(via pbsarts)

Source: crossconnectmag
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staff:

Have a good weekend, Tumblr. 

staff:

Have a good weekend, Tumblr. 

Source: sludg33y
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hifructosemag:

Originally from Korea, David Choong Lee (featured in HF Vol. 30) has been a staple of San Francisco’s art scene for the past 20 years. Known for his elaborate assemblages composed of individual paintings on boxes on different depths, Lee deftly blends figuration with abstract dreamscapes, inserting realistically-rendered figures into explosions of shapes and kaleidoscopic colors. For his latest body of work, however, Lee emptied his paintings of human presence. His solo show “Cosmic Dust,” opening at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco on September 13, will feature a series of acrylic paintings on canvas that focus on Lee’s intergalactic worlds — untouched and uninhabited. Honing in on the psychedelic imagery that once served as a background for his figures, he unfurls pools of liquid rainbows, mysterious glowing orbs and powerful beams of light. His new work gives the sensation of touching down on another planet. See more on Hi-Fructose.

Source: hifructosemag
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From our episode “Bill Carter & The Blame.”

Source: themagicofvenice